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Harmony in living course

Harmony in Living workshops headline

Harmony in Living course: 4 workshops on

12 and 26 February, 12 and 26 March, 19.00-21.00

Venue: RE:CENTRE, Thames WharfRainville Rd, London W6 9HA

£30 per workshop

Book your place for these events through Re:centre: https://recentre.co.uk/events

Harmony in living course will guide you through an exploration of ancient traditions, deepening your appreciation of being alive. Slow down. Pay attention. Live each moment fully. Becoming conscious of your type, lifestyle patterns and ‘ways of being’ can bring better health and happiness. These exploratory workshops will energise you with ideas, providing a greater understanding of what creates health and balance.

Discover your own practice of harmony in living.

The course consists of 4 x 120 minutes exploratory workshops led by Dr Eleni, a medical Consultant and Ayurveda practitioner. The workshops combine the power of wisdom traditions, current medical practice and Ayurveda with other scientifically proven practices, such as meditation, to help you lay the foundations of good health. Guided meditation, knowledge exchange, sharing of personal experiences, food and drink recipes, music and art brought to you by Dr Eleni.

About Dr Eleni 

Dr Eleni Tsiompanou is an experienced Medical Consultant who has worked in the NHS since 1997. She is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of London (FRCP) who has also trained in Ayurveda and nutritional medicine. Eleni’s personal quest, knowledge and ongoing research has uncovered gems of practical information which can help people find their own balance, better health and harmony. As an Ambassador for the ‘College of Medicine’ in the Harmony project, Eleni is inspired by HRH, The Prince of Wales’s book Harmony: A New Way of Looking at Our World, which reminds us of some profoundly important truths, namely that everything in the universe is connected and balanced by universal laws and relationships.

12 February – Principles of Ayurveda 

Description: Ayurveda, which means the Science of Life in Sanskrit, is a 5,000 year old practical and holistic approach to health. It regards everyone as a unique individual. Its main principle is in helping us find a balance between our mind, body and spirit. It looks at our individual type, energy, diet, personality as well as our relationships and environment, to offer guidance in maintaining a harmonious state of being.

Content: A talk about how Ayurveda can improve your life. Learn how to approach your health in an interesting and practical way with diet and natural exercises. Understand other people and how to effectively relate to them. Try a guided meditation to deepen your awareness and access your hidden energy.

Book: https://recentre.co.uk/events/principles-of-ayurveda-harmony-in-living-welcome-series/

26 Feb – Too much fire? Diet and the elements

Description: Our inner fire is our engine of health. We need a balance between our different ‘elements’. Ancient sources, Pythagoras and Hippocrates, the father of medicine, as well as Ayurveda, define health as the harmony of man’s elemental components. Our modern life often creates too much ‘fire’ which disturbs harmony and leads to dis-ease. How can diet, lifestyle and nature help us improve our health?

Content: Find out what in your diet, lifestyle, relationships and environment nourishes your mind, body and spirit. Examine the value of intuition, wisdom traditions and science in creating harmony in your life. Try recipes for herbal drinks that can help balance your inner fire. Experience the effect of singing on the whole of you.

Book: https://recentre.co.uk/events/diet-and-the-elements-harmony-in-living-welcome-series-too-much-fire/

12 March – Conscious eating – tradition and practice

Description: Cooking with care and love can be a meditative practice. Eating with attention aids digestion. The resonances of time, place and our own nature – individual type, age, health condition – when sharing meals have been important in many cultures including the Mediterranean, Seventh Day Adventists and often for centenarians. Learn how positive rituals can improve our meals, health and being.

Content: Find out about positive new ways of approaching cooking, eating and sharing a meal. Learn some easy food recipes and open up all of your senses in an exercise of mindful eating.

Bookhttps://recentre.co.uk/events/conscious-eating-tradition-and-practice-harmony-in-living/

26 March – Fasting for harmony and longevity

Description: The main type of fast is to go without food for an extended period. Fasting allows the body to have a good ‘house-cleaning’ and a rest. Fasting as a way to health and long life, can aid recovery from certain illnesses. All the major religious traditions apply it in their spiritual practice. Gandhi used it, making the personal political. Modern medicine having re-discovered fasting, has now given it a stamp of approval.

Content: Learn essential practical steps to fasting for your health, weight-loss or recovery from dis-ease. Experience the nourishing effect of art exercises. Try a guided meditation to use in your preparation for fasting

Bookhttps://recentre.co.uk/events/fasting-for-harmony-and-longevity-harmony-in-living/

 

MEDICAL KITCHEN WISDOM

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What would it mean to cook and eat consciously?

To put heaven and earth in the dish that you prepare for eating?

To pay full attention even to the simplest meal and give all your heart when cooking for others and for yourself? To eat in a peaceful environment, slowly and appreciating the world with all your senses?

From the kitchen of Mount Athos in Greece to the Buddhist temples in Japan, these concepts are key to preparation, appreciation and enjoyment of food.

Come and explore with me ‘Conscious Eating’ and ‘Heart-Warming Cooking”. 
https://www.meetup.com/Medical-Kitchen-Wisdom/

Conscious Eating

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Healthy eating has to do with what we eat, what we absorb & how we eat. We can combine conscious eating to all these aspects: primarily by eating with attention, mindfully but also, by learning to eat according to our type & choosing foods that are from a sustainable source.

Practicing to cook and eat consciously can affect our health & being in tangible & intangible ways:

- by reducing stress

- improving digestion and absorption of nutrients

- optimising the amount we eat

- helping us be in tune with our body and seasons

- influencing our energy and awareness.

We are going to explore these useful principles in the “Conscious Eating” workshop.

The Health Being Institute “Diet and Philosophy” and “Medical Kitchen Wisdom” workshops provide an opportunity for people who are searching to bring together wisdom and science for the benefit of themselves, other people they know and the wider community. 

Workshops provide an interesting, joyful exchange, learning from each other in a relaxing environment, with a healthy snack and tea provided.

Booking is essential. Places are limited and demand is high. Cost: £10 per person. 

To book for place, please email me at: eleni.soma@gmail.com or phone: 07958 495537 

Venue: Woolman room, 8-9 Hop Gardens, London WC2N 4EH

I can provide you with a CPD certificate, if you need it.

To find out more and book online: go to my meetup group ‘Medical Kitchen Wisdom’ on https://www.meetup.com/Medical-Kitchen-Wisdom/ or check my Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/www.healthbeinginstitute.co.uk/

“Seven Spices for Health”

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Learn how to use spices in your everyday life to support your health. We will explore 7 spices for their medicinal properties but also for their ability to enhance the taste and smell of our food, bringing life to our mealtimes.

“Food is Medicine”, Hippocrates the wise Greek physician of the 5th century BC wrote. When I was researching his books for my thesis, I found quotes such as ‘Coriander is hot and astringent; it stops heartburn, and when eaten last also causes sleep’ and ‘Wild saffron passes by stool’. Spices were differentiated according to their taste and the effect they had on the body. Clearly the ancients also used spices for their medicinal purposes. They recognised spices had an effect in the body and used them accordingly. Modern science confirms the powerful properties of spices.

Eating a tasty, aromatic, colourful, nutritious meal in a quite, pleasant environment and with attention is a powerful holistic experience that nourishes the body, mind and spirit. When we leave out one of these factors, then we feel like we are missing something and turn to more food or other substances and experiences to make up for the loss and to seek happiness. This has led in the 21st century to the epidemic of obesity and other chronic diseases. Spices can be one of the factors that can save us from disease and poor quality of being.

For this workshop I am very happy to welcome my guest speaker Vivian Voulgaraki. Vivian was born and raised in the island of Crete. Her journey in life brought her back to her roots where she set up “Pure Philosophy”, a private company that produces Holistic skin care and nutrition products and promotes natural and healthy living with respect to animals and nature. She will talk to us about a very special spice called carob which she has researched. The story of carobs has a special meaning for Greeks, as the consumption of carobs saved a lot of people and children during the war period and austerity. Evidently, this spice has special properties which Vivian will discuss further.

AGNOTIS – Pure Philosophy www.agnotis.eu

Please join us for this special event and taste a caramelised carob cake and raw carob gluten and dairy free biscuits, made using Vivian’s organic Carob syrup and powder, prepared by our chef Mariana Ivanova. Recipes will be provided.

 

“Brain Loving Foods & Lifestyle: Ways to Avoid Dementia” Workshop

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What could we do to prevent dementia and even delay its’ progress?

In this workshop, Dr Garuth Chalfont, from the Division of Health Research, University of Lancaster and Dr Eleni Tsiompanou from the Health-Being Institute, will discuss different natural and holistic interventions including:

• modern Nutritional Medicine

• functional foods developed in Japan

• horticultural therapy

• our connection with nature

• lifestyle and brain games

• ancient Ayurvedic nutrition and Hippocratic Medicine

• philosophy, music and storytelling

Research shows what’s good for the heart and the gut is good for the brain.

Come and join us on Saturday 25th June 11am-1:30pm at this unique workshop in the centre on London. Along with an interesting discussion, we offer ideas for cooking (“brain loving foods”) and some delicious snacks designed to nourish your heart and brain, prepared by chef Mariana Ivanova.

Cost: £20 per person

Venue: 8-9 Hop Gardens, London WC2N 4EH

TO BOOK email: ihealthbeing@gmail.com or phone: 07958495537

Ancient Hippocratic Wisdom for a Harmonious Diet: “ΔΙΑΙΤΑ”

We are coming together again on the 9th of May to continue our exploration of the ‘Power of Foods’, what Ancient Hippocratic Philosophy can teach us and how we can aspire to a Harmonious Diet, which is called “ΔΙΑΙΤΑ”.
If you are in London, then come and join us.
For more information & to book a place, 
e-mail me: ihealthbeing@gmail.com or
phone me: 07958-495537 
Saturday 9 May 2015, 12 – 2:30 pm
The Woolman Room, 8-9 Hop Gardens, London WC2N 4EH
Cost: £25 per person. Limited availability. ‘Greek mountain tea’ and ‘Hippocratic snacks’ will be provided.

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“The Power of Ancient Greek Foods” Workshop

Learn how to choose foods, combine & cook them, to use their power for your own health.

Listen to Ancient Recipes with their History and Nutrition Secrets.

This workshop will concentrate on Ancient Greek Foods, popular in modern day life, such as figs, pomegranates, greens, herbs, millet, barley, fish, dairy etc.

‘ it is necessary to know the property, not only of foods themselves, whether corn, drink or meat, but also of the country from which they come’

Foods in their natural form have different properties to foods modified by the ‘human art’ 

These two quotes taken from the Hippocratic books were written 2,500 years ago.

We will examine them under the lens of modern science and medicine.

We will continue to explore the power of foods in future workshops.

To find out more come to our 3rd “Ancient Wisdom & Harmonious Diet” workshop with Dr Eleni.

Saturday  7 March 2015 12-2:00 pm

8-9 Hop Gardens (off St Martin’s Lane), London WC2N 4EH 

Cost: £20 (includes Greek mountain tea & date truffles)

More information & to book a place: ihealthbeing@gmail.com - 07958 495537 

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Why I am looking forward to my talk next week at the British Oncology Pharmacy Association

Slowly but steadily healthcare professionals acknowledge the important role nutrition has to play in the management of people with cancer.

Next week I will be speaking to UK oncology pharmacists about the value of good nutrition in cancer patients

I am going to talk about the two big systematic reviews which showed that current dietetic treatment of cancer patients has no evidence base. I will then ask the audience to consider ways forward.

I will also offer my informed opinion on how we should be using diet and lifestyle to support people diagnosed with cancer: at the time of diagnosis, during their treatment, when they are cleared of any signs of cancer, when they are at the palliative stage and when they are dying.

Nutritional and lifestyle medicine can be of huge help to cancer patients. The literature to support this is significant and the majority of people affected seeks ways to improve their diet and lifestyle, in parallel to their pharmacological treatment.

It’s time for the NHS to acknowledge and endorse the ancient motto that ‘Food is Medicine’

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Top American Cardiologist recommends Vegan Diet for Heart Health

CardioBuzz: Vegan Diet, Healthy Heart?

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In this guest blog, Kim A. Williams, MD, a cardiologist at Rush University in Chicago and the next president of the American College of Cardiology, explains why he went vegan and now recommends it to patients.

Physicians want to influence their patients to make lifestyle changes that will improve their health, but sometimes the roles are reversed and we are inspired by patients. It was a patient’s success reversing an alarming condition that motivated me to investigate a vegan diet.

Just before the American College of Cardiology’s (ACC) annual meeting in 2003 I learned that my LDL cholesterol level was 170. It was clear that I needed to change something. Six months earlier, I had read a nuclear scan on a patient with very-high-risk findings — a severe three-vessel disease pattern of reversible ischemia.

The patient came back to the nuclear lab just before that 2003 ACC meeting. She had been following Dean Ornish, MD’s program for “Reversing Heart Disease,” which includes a plant-based diet, exercise, and meditation. She said that her chest pain had resolved in about 6 weeks, and her scan had become essentially normalized on this program.

When I got that LDL result, I looked up the details of the plant-based diet in Ornish’s publications — 1- and 5-year angiographic outcomes and marked improvement on PET perfusion scanning — small numbers of patients, but outcomes that reached statistical significance.

I thought I had a healthy diet — no red meat, no fried foods, little dairy, just chicken breast and fish. But a simple Web search informed me that my chicken-breast meals had more cholesterol content (84 mg/100 g) than pork (62 mg/100 g). So I changed that day to a cholesterol-free diet, using “meat substitutes” commonly available in stores and restaurants for protein. Within 6 weeks my LDL cholesterol level was down to 90.

I often discuss the benefits of adopting a plant-based diet with patients who have high cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension, or coronary artery disease. I encourage these patients to go to the grocery store and sample different plant-based versions of many of the basic foods they eat. For me, some of the items, such as chicken and egg substitutes, were actually better-tasting.

There are dozens of products to sample and there will obviously be some that you like and some that you don’t. One of my favorite sampling venues was the new Tiger Stadium (Comerica Park) in Detroit, where there are five vegan items, including an Italian sausage that is hard to distinguish from real meat until you check your blood pressure – vegan protein makes blood pressures fall.

In some parts of country and some parts of world, finding vegan restaurants can be a challenge. But in most places, it is pretty easy to find vegan-friendly options with a little local Web searching. Web searching can also help with the patients who are concerned about taste or missing their favorite foods. I typically search with the patient and quickly email suggestions.

Interestingly, our ACC/American Heart Association (AHA) prevention guidelines do not specifically recommend a vegan diet, as the studies are very large and observational or small and randomized, such as those on Ornish’s whole food, plant-based diet intervention reversing coronary artery stenosis. The data are very compelling, but larger randomized trials are needed to pass muster with our rigorous guideline methodology.

Wouldn’t it be a laudable goal of the American College of Cardiology to put ourselves out of business within a generation or two? We have come a long way in prevention of cardiovascular disease, but we still have a long way to go. Improving our lifestyles with improved diet and exercise will help us get there.

CardioBuzz is a blog for readers with an interest in cardiology.

Credits: Kim A. Williams MD, medpagetoday.com

Natural sources of Vitamin B12 for vegetarians

Dried Purple Laver

The main sources of vitamin B12 are animal foods.

People who are vegetarians are at risk of becoming vitamin B12 deficient, especially if they have other factors that can cause

  • increased demand such as during pregnancy or
  • impaired absorption of the vitamin, such as after stomach or gut surgery, from long-term use of proton pump inhibitors, due to malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth, as a result of alcoholism or malnutrition due to various causes

A new study from Japan looked in detail at the various sources of vitamin B12 for vegetarians. The researchers found that the highest concentration is found in:

dried purple laver, an edible seaweed called Nori in Japan, Zicai in China and Gim in Korea

Read more in their article published in the peer review journal Nutrients.

The full article can be accessed for free here:

http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/6/5/1861

Nori is easy to use. Sprinkle it over salad or make sushi are two ways to eat it raw. It’s better not to toast it as it reduces the concentration of vitamin B12.

Remember: Eat Real Food. It is always better than taking supplements.