“Seven Spices for Health”

slide1

Learn how to use spices in your everyday life to support your health. We will explore 7 spices for their medicinal properties but also for their ability to enhance the taste and smell of our food, bringing life to our mealtimes.

“Food is Medicine”, Hippocrates the wise Greek physician of the 5th century BC wrote. When I was researching his books for my thesis, I found quotes such as ‘Coriander is hot and astringent; it stops heartburn, and when eaten last also causes sleep’ and ‘Wild saffron passes by stool’. Spices were differentiated according to their taste and the effect they had on the body. Clearly the ancients also used spices for their medicinal purposes. They recognised spices had an effect in the body and used them accordingly. Modern science confirms the powerful properties of spices.

Eating a tasty, aromatic, colourful, nutritious meal in a quite, pleasant environment and with attention is a powerful holistic experience that nourishes the body, mind and spirit. When we leave out one of these factors, then we feel like we are missing something and turn to more food or other substances and experiences to make up for the loss and to seek happiness. This has led in the 21st century to the epidemic of obesity and other chronic diseases. Spices can be one of the factors that can save us from disease and poor quality of being.

For this workshop I am very happy to welcome my guest speaker Vivian Voulgaraki. Vivian was born and raised in the island of Crete. Her journey in life brought her back to her roots where she set up “Pure Philosophy”, a private company that produces Holistic skin care and nutrition products and promotes natural and healthy living with respect to animals and nature. She will talk to us about a very special spice called carob which she has researched. The story of carobs has a special meaning for Greeks, as the consumption of carobs saved a lot of people and children during the war period and austerity. Evidently, this spice has special properties which Vivian will discuss further.

AGNOTIS – Pure Philosophy www.agnotis.eu

Please join us for this special event and taste a caramelised carob cake and raw carob gluten and dairy free biscuits, made using Vivian’s organic Carob syrup and powder, prepared by our chef Mariana Ivanova. Recipes will be provided.

 

“Brain Loving Foods & Lifestyle: Ways to Avoid Dementia” Workshop

Slide1

What could we do to prevent dementia and even delay its’ progress?

In this workshop, Dr Garuth Chalfont, from the Division of Health Research, University of Lancaster and Dr Eleni Tsiompanou from the Health-Being Institute, will discuss different natural and holistic interventions including:

• modern Nutritional Medicine

• functional foods developed in Japan

• horticultural therapy

• our connection with nature

• lifestyle and brain games

• ancient Ayurvedic nutrition and Hippocratic Medicine

• philosophy, music and storytelling

Research shows what’s good for the heart and the gut is good for the brain.

Come and join us on Saturday 25th June 11am-1:30pm at this unique workshop in the centre on London. Along with an interesting discussion, we offer ideas for cooking (“brain loving foods”) and some delicious snacks designed to nourish your heart and brain, prepared by chef Mariana Ivanova.

Cost: £20 per person

Venue: 8-9 Hop Gardens, London WC2N 4EH

TO BOOK email: ihealthbeing@gmail.com or phone: 07958495537

Ancient Hippocratic Wisdom for a Harmonious Diet: “ΔΙΑΙΤΑ”

We are coming together again on the 9th of May to continue our exploration of the ‘Power of Foods’, what Ancient Hippocratic Philosophy can teach us and how we can aspire to a Harmonious Diet, which is called “ΔΙΑΙΤΑ”.
If you are in London, then come and join us.
For more information & to book a place, 
e-mail me: ihealthbeing@gmail.com or
phone me: 07958-495537 
Saturday 9 May 2015, 12 – 2:30 pm
The Woolman Room, 8-9 Hop Gardens, London WC2N 4EH
Cost: £25 per person. Limited availability. ‘Greek mountain tea’ and ‘Hippocratic snacks’ will be provided.

Slide1

“The Power of Ancient Greek Foods” Workshop

Learn how to choose foods, combine & cook them, to use their power for your own health.

Listen to Ancient Recipes with their History and Nutrition Secrets.

This workshop will concentrate on Ancient Greek Foods, popular in modern day life, such as figs, pomegranates, greens, herbs, millet, barley, fish, dairy etc.

‘ it is necessary to know the property, not only of foods themselves, whether corn, drink or meat, but also of the country from which they come’

Foods in their natural form have different properties to foods modified by the ‘human art’ 

These two quotes taken from the Hippocratic books were written 2,500 years ago.

We will examine them under the lens of modern science and medicine.

We will continue to explore the power of foods in future workshops.

To find out more come to our 3rd “Ancient Wisdom & Harmonious Diet” workshop with Dr Eleni.

Saturday  7 March 2015 12-2:00 pm

8-9 Hop Gardens (off St Martin’s Lane), London WC2N 4EH 

Cost: £20 (includes Greek mountain tea & date truffles)

More information & to book a place: ihealthbeing@gmail.com - 07958 495537 

Slide1

Walking v Running – which is the healthiest?

 

While I was away, I read some interesting articles about the relative benefits of walking and running. This was of interest to me, as I had taken the advice of Eleni Tsiompanou, the integrative doctor at Penny Brohn, to stop running some time ago.Overall, it seems the benefits of a 5-minute run, match those of a 15-minute walk. Broadly speaking, it seems the benefits associated with a 25-minute run are equivalent to walking for 1 hour 45 minutes. Obviously if you are  young  healthy and reasonably fit, running is more time-efficient. Or is it? With running there is time spent getting changed twice and showering afterwards. (Assuming that you have a healthy attitude to personal hygiene) Plus, there is the  time stretching (before and/or after running) and maybe even cooling down. So a 15-minute run could, in reality, easily take an hour out of one’s day. This is  significantly more time than that devoted to say, a 45-minute walk (which, generally, will require no changing, stretching or showering) and you spend all the time outside!Runners may also be prone to injury. I know from first hand experience about this. When I used to run a lot, I had a succession of running related injuries (shin splints, right calf,  lower back, to name a few), which was one of the reasons which eventually led me to think about giving up running.Prior to my liver resection in February 2011, I had a personal trainer who was helping me get fit again, after a year of very gentle exercise. My aim was to run a 10km race and raise money for cancer charities. I was feeling great and beginning to enjoy the running. Then I was diagnosed with a metastasise in my liver. It required surgery. I had to stop the running while I recovered from my surgery.

That March as part of my post op recovery, I went to Penny Brohn for a few days. During which I saw Eleni  Tsiompanou ( an Intergrative Health Doctor) and we discussed the subject of exercise and how much was advisable. I told her what my plans were and that I hoped to get back to running again soon. I was not expecting what she said. I remember her words “Running – no way – this is far too much for you. Walking – most definitely and as much as you like. But running no”.  I was confused!

The reason, she explained to me, was that my immune system was having a difficult time dealing with fighting off the cancer cells floating around my body. Running can suppress the immune system. So if my immune system is suppressed after I run then the cancer cells can prosper. Which is not a good idea.This made sense! Cardio/aerobic (distance) running is known to (stress) suppress the immune system, You only have to think of distance runners such as Mo Farah, Paula Radcliffe who have been prone to infection illnesses . 

Walking can be sustained all year and can be carried on as you get older. Walking is much easier and in my experience it is more conducive to ‘social networking’. Another advantage of walking is that it can easily be incorporated into one’s daily routine. My friends are of the age when going for a walk is not too off putting. I can’t think too many of my friends who would get excited by asking them to go for a 5km run. But a walk with Colin and me seems to be OK.

Source: http://addictedtogreentea.blogspot.co.uk

Posted by 

Diet and Hippocratic Philosophy

If you are interested in using diet and Ancient Greek wisdom to live a more healthy life,  join the Health Being Institute education program on: “Diet and Hippocratic Wisdom”.

The program will be launched next Monday in the birth country of Hippocrates, Greece. A number of workshops will be given from September onwards in Central London.

What you will learn:

* How ancient Hippocratic philosophy still teaches us methods to be healthy

* How to use the wisdom of Ancient Greek philosophers to uncover you long-term beliefs and unconscious attitudes towards your body, health and well-being

* What are the lessons that Hippocratic philosophy can teach us today

* What modern science has proven to be true of the Hippocratic medicine and how to use it to move towards a healthier you

IMG_0258

Natural sources of Vitamin B12 for vegetarians

Dried Purple Laver

The main sources of vitamin B12 are animal foods.

People who are vegetarians are at risk of becoming vitamin B12 deficient, especially if they have other factors that can cause

  • increased demand such as during pregnancy or
  • impaired absorption of the vitamin, such as after stomach or gut surgery, from long-term use of proton pump inhibitors, due to malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth, as a result of alcoholism or malnutrition due to various causes

A new study from Japan looked in detail at the various sources of vitamin B12 for vegetarians. The researchers found that the highest concentration is found in:

dried purple laver, an edible seaweed called Nori in Japan, Zicai in China and Gim in Korea

Read more in their article published in the peer review journal Nutrients.

The full article can be accessed for free here:

http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/6/5/1861

Nori is easy to use. Sprinkle it over salad or make sushi are two ways to eat it raw. It’s better not to toast it as it reduces the concentration of vitamin B12.

Remember: Eat Real Food. It is always better than taking supplements.

 

Nature – the Primary Medicine for Health & Way of Being

Slide1

‘Come forth into the light of things, Let Nature Be Your Teacher’. William Worsdworth’s call to be immersed in Nature comes with a promise of a deeper understanding of life and of ourselves. In this Health-Being meeting we will explore what we can learn from Nature for our Health and our Being, but also how in the modern world, our relationship with her has created problems and challenges that we cannot afford to ignore.

Some say: ‘what use is Nature in the 21st century’? We simply reply that: the air that we breathe, the water that we drink and the soil in which we grow our food determine our existence. Nature can provide us with many products to sustain and support our physical, emotional and spiritual balance. What did Hippocrates mean when he wrote: ‘a physician is first and foremost Nature’s helper’? What natural resources can we use safely to help ourselves in times of good or ill health? And what can we give back to our Mother Nature, so that she doesn’t get emptied from the energies that we so much depend on? How can we make sure that we use and not abuse our natural environment given the inextricable connection it has with human health?

If we look and listen carefully to Nature’s geometry and language, we will understand everything better. This isn’t just a ‘trend’. Our future and the future of our children depends on it.

“Health and Nature”

You are invited to the June Health Being Event.

Number of places are limited so please let us know if you are coming by sending an e-mail to:

healthbeinginstitute@gmail.com

When? Saturday 7th of June, 11:30-13.00

Where? Society of Friends Meeting House, 8 Hop Gardens, WC2N 4EA, London

Join like-minded people and come to a discussion on the theme of:

‘Health and Nature’

‘Come forth into the light of things, Let Nature Be Your Teacher’. William Worsdworth’s call to be immersed in Nature comes with a promise of a deeper understanding of life and of ourselves. In this Health-Being event we will explore what we can learn from Nature for our Health and our Being, but also how in the modern world, our relationship with her  has created problems and challenges that we cannot afford to ignore.

Some say: ‘what use is Nature in the 21st century’? We simply reply that: the air that we breathe, the water that we drink and the soil in which we grow our food determine our existence. Nature can provide us with many products to sustain and support our physical, emotional and spiritual balance. What did Hippocrates mean when he wrote: ‘a physician is first and foremost Nature’s helper’? What natural resources can we use safely to help ourselves in times of good or ill health? And what can we give back to our Mother Nature, so that she doesn’t get emptied from the energies that we so much depend on? How can we make sure that we use and not abuse our natural environment given the inextricable connection it has with human health?

If we look and listen carefully to Nature’s geometry and language, we will understand everything better. This isn’t just a ‘trend’. Our future and the future of our children depends on it.

Slide1