“Anti-Inflammatory DIAITA: Diet & Lifestyle” Workshop, 11 March 2017, London

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Following our last successful meeting on Anti-Cancer DIAITA, in this multi-dimensional workshop, I will expand on ways to reduce inflammation in the body, the primary cause of many diseases such as cancer, heart disease, auto-immune diseases, depression etc.

I will explore Science, Medicine and Ancient Wisdom to find the available knowledge and understanding offered to us to create an anti-inflammatory way of living.

Anti-Inflammatory DIAITA combines:

• foods, herbs and spices

• ways of eating and fasting

• types of exercises (natural and unnatural)

• meditation

• ways to deal with stress & anxiety & improve sleep and

• a connection with other people, the environment & something higher than us!

Connect with others in a friendly environment which invites questions and offers answers to a modern problem of an ‘inflammatory life’ that affects us all.

Learn about healthy meals, herbal remedies and easy recipes to use in your daily life.

Explore philosophy, spirituality and try meditation to connect with your body.

Saturday 11th of March, 11-13:30.

Venue: Woolman room, 8-9 Hop Gardens, London WC2N 4EH

Cost: £25 per person

Book early to avoid disappointment as places are limited and demand is high.


I can provide you with a CPD certificate, if you need it.

“DIAITA Against Cancer: Diet & Lifestyle Dodecalogue” Workshop

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In this ANTI-CANCER DIAITA workshop, for World Cancer Day on the 4th of February, I’m going to dispel the myth that there is nothing people can do about cancer. Research shows that, with a healthier diet and lifestyle a third of the most common cancers can be prevented.

 

DIAITA, the ancient Greek word meaning “Way of Living”, is where the word DIET comes from.

I am going to draw on evidence, knowledge and wisdom from Modern Medicine, Aurveda, Philosophy & Spirituality, to show that with the right DIAITA it is possible to: 

  • prevent cancer
  • reduce the side effects of cancer treatment and
  • improve quality of life in cancer survivors

I will give you my Dodecalogue for cancer prevention.

You can join me either in London on the 28th of January 2017 or in Kozani-Greece on the 13th of February.

Along with an interesting discussion, you will be offered ideas for cooking (“anti-cancer recipes”) and some delicious anti-cancer snacks, prepared by chef Mariana Ivanova.

Cost: £25 per person

Venue: Woolman room, 8-9 Hop Gardens, London WC2N 4EH

TO BOOK email: ihealthbeing@gmail.com or phone: 07958495537

Walking v Running – which is the healthiest?

 

While I was away, I read some interesting articles about the relative benefits of walking and running. This was of interest to me, as I had taken the advice of Eleni Tsiompanou, the integrative doctor at Penny Brohn, to stop running some time ago.Overall, it seems the benefits of a 5-minute run, match those of a 15-minute walk. Broadly speaking, it seems the benefits associated with a 25-minute run are equivalent to walking for 1 hour 45 minutes. Obviously if you are  young  healthy and reasonably fit, running is more time-efficient. Or is it? With running there is time spent getting changed twice and showering afterwards. (Assuming that you have a healthy attitude to personal hygiene) Plus, there is the  time stretching (before and/or after running) and maybe even cooling down. So a 15-minute run could, in reality, easily take an hour out of one’s day. This is  significantly more time than that devoted to say, a 45-minute walk (which, generally, will require no changing, stretching or showering) and you spend all the time outside!Runners may also be prone to injury. I know from first hand experience about this. When I used to run a lot, I had a succession of running related injuries (shin splints, right calf,  lower back, to name a few), which was one of the reasons which eventually led me to think about giving up running.Prior to my liver resection in February 2011, I had a personal trainer who was helping me get fit again, after a year of very gentle exercise. My aim was to run a 10km race and raise money for cancer charities. I was feeling great and beginning to enjoy the running. Then I was diagnosed with a metastasise in my liver. It required surgery. I had to stop the running while I recovered from my surgery.

That March as part of my post op recovery, I went to Penny Brohn for a few days. During which I saw Eleni  Tsiompanou ( an Intergrative Health Doctor) and we discussed the subject of exercise and how much was advisable. I told her what my plans were and that I hoped to get back to running again soon. I was not expecting what she said. I remember her words “Running – no way – this is far too much for you. Walking – most definitely and as much as you like. But running no”.  I was confused!

The reason, she explained to me, was that my immune system was having a difficult time dealing with fighting off the cancer cells floating around my body. Running can suppress the immune system. So if my immune system is suppressed after I run then the cancer cells can prosper. Which is not a good idea.This made sense! Cardio/aerobic (distance) running is known to (stress) suppress the immune system, You only have to think of distance runners such as Mo Farah, Paula Radcliffe who have been prone to infection illnesses . 

Walking can be sustained all year and can be carried on as you get older. Walking is much easier and in my experience it is more conducive to ‘social networking’. Another advantage of walking is that it can easily be incorporated into one’s daily routine. My friends are of the age when going for a walk is not too off putting. I can’t think too many of my friends who would get excited by asking them to go for a 5km run. But a walk with Colin and me seems to be OK.

Source: http://addictedtogreentea.blogspot.co.uk

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