“Anti-Inflammatory DIAITA: Diet & Lifestyle” Workshop, 11 March 2017, London

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Following our last successful meeting on Anti-Cancer DIAITA, in this multi-dimensional workshop, I will expand on ways to reduce inflammation in the body, the primary cause of many diseases such as cancer, heart disease, auto-immune diseases, depression etc.

I will explore Science, Medicine and Ancient Wisdom to find the available knowledge and understanding offered to us to create an anti-inflammatory way of living.

Anti-Inflammatory DIAITA combines:

• foods, herbs and spices

• ways of eating and fasting

• types of exercises (natural and unnatural)

• meditation

• ways to deal with stress & anxiety & improve sleep and

• a connection with other people, the environment & something higher than us!

Connect with others in a friendly environment which invites questions and offers answers to a modern problem of an ‘inflammatory life’ that affects us all.

Learn about healthy meals, herbal remedies and easy recipes to use in your daily life.

Explore philosophy, spirituality and try meditation to connect with your body.

Saturday 11th of March, 11-13:30.

Venue: Woolman room, 8-9 Hop Gardens, London WC2N 4EH

Cost: £25 per person

Book early to avoid disappointment as places are limited and demand is high.


I can provide you with a CPD certificate, if you need it.

“Brain Loving Foods & Lifestyle: Ways to Avoid Dementia” Workshop

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What could we do to prevent dementia and even delay its’ progress?

In this workshop, Dr Garuth Chalfont, from the Division of Health Research, University of Lancaster and Dr Eleni Tsiompanou from the Health-Being Institute, will discuss different natural and holistic interventions including:

• modern Nutritional Medicine

• functional foods developed in Japan

• horticultural therapy

• our connection with nature

• lifestyle and brain games

• ancient Ayurvedic nutrition and Hippocratic Medicine

• philosophy, music and storytelling

Research shows what’s good for the heart and the gut is good for the brain.

Come and join us on Saturday 25th June 11am-1:30pm at this unique workshop in the centre on London. Along with an interesting discussion, we offer ideas for cooking (“brain loving foods”) and some delicious snacks designed to nourish your heart and brain, prepared by chef Mariana Ivanova.

Cost: £20 per person

Venue: 8-9 Hop Gardens, London WC2N 4EH

TO BOOK email: ihealthbeing@gmail.com or phone: 07958495537

Top American Cardiologist recommends Vegan Diet for Heart Health

CardioBuzz: Vegan Diet, Healthy Heart?

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In this guest blog, Kim A. Williams, MD, a cardiologist at Rush University in Chicago and the next president of the American College of Cardiology, explains why he went vegan and now recommends it to patients.

Physicians want to influence their patients to make lifestyle changes that will improve their health, but sometimes the roles are reversed and we are inspired by patients. It was a patient’s success reversing an alarming condition that motivated me to investigate a vegan diet.

Just before the American College of Cardiology’s (ACC) annual meeting in 2003 I learned that my LDL cholesterol level was 170. It was clear that I needed to change something. Six months earlier, I had read a nuclear scan on a patient with very-high-risk findings — a severe three-vessel disease pattern of reversible ischemia.

The patient came back to the nuclear lab just before that 2003 ACC meeting. She had been following Dean Ornish, MD’s program for “Reversing Heart Disease,” which includes a plant-based diet, exercise, and meditation. She said that her chest pain had resolved in about 6 weeks, and her scan had become essentially normalized on this program.

When I got that LDL result, I looked up the details of the plant-based diet in Ornish’s publications — 1- and 5-year angiographic outcomes and marked improvement on PET perfusion scanning — small numbers of patients, but outcomes that reached statistical significance.

I thought I had a healthy diet — no red meat, no fried foods, little dairy, just chicken breast and fish. But a simple Web search informed me that my chicken-breast meals had more cholesterol content (84 mg/100 g) than pork (62 mg/100 g). So I changed that day to a cholesterol-free diet, using “meat substitutes” commonly available in stores and restaurants for protein. Within 6 weeks my LDL cholesterol level was down to 90.

I often discuss the benefits of adopting a plant-based diet with patients who have high cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension, or coronary artery disease. I encourage these patients to go to the grocery store and sample different plant-based versions of many of the basic foods they eat. For me, some of the items, such as chicken and egg substitutes, were actually better-tasting.

There are dozens of products to sample and there will obviously be some that you like and some that you don’t. One of my favorite sampling venues was the new Tiger Stadium (Comerica Park) in Detroit, where there are five vegan items, including an Italian sausage that is hard to distinguish from real meat until you check your blood pressure – vegan protein makes blood pressures fall.

In some parts of country and some parts of world, finding vegan restaurants can be a challenge. But in most places, it is pretty easy to find vegan-friendly options with a little local Web searching. Web searching can also help with the patients who are concerned about taste or missing their favorite foods. I typically search with the patient and quickly email suggestions.

Interestingly, our ACC/American Heart Association (AHA) prevention guidelines do not specifically recommend a vegan diet, as the studies are very large and observational or small and randomized, such as those on Ornish’s whole food, plant-based diet intervention reversing coronary artery stenosis. The data are very compelling, but larger randomized trials are needed to pass muster with our rigorous guideline methodology.

Wouldn’t it be a laudable goal of the American College of Cardiology to put ourselves out of business within a generation or two? We have come a long way in prevention of cardiovascular disease, but we still have a long way to go. Improving our lifestyles with improved diet and exercise will help us get there.

CardioBuzz is a blog for readers with an interest in cardiology.

Credits: Kim A. Williams MD, medpagetoday.com