“The Power of Ancient Greek Foods” Workshop

Learn how to choose foods, combine & cook them, to use their power for your own health.

Listen to Ancient Recipes with their History and Nutrition Secrets.

This workshop will concentrate on Ancient Greek Foods, popular in modern day life, such as figs, pomegranates, greens, herbs, millet, barley, fish, dairy etc.

‘ it is necessary to know the property, not only of foods themselves, whether corn, drink or meat, but also of the country from which they come’

Foods in their natural form have different properties to foods modified by the ‘human art’ 

These two quotes taken from the Hippocratic books were written 2,500 years ago.

We will examine them under the lens of modern science and medicine.

We will continue to explore the power of foods in future workshops.

To find out more come to our 3rd “Ancient Wisdom & Harmonious Diet” workshop with Dr Eleni.

Saturday  7 March 2015 12-2:00 pm

8-9 Hop Gardens (off St Martin’s Lane), London WC2N 4EH 

Cost: £20 (includes Greek mountain tea & date truffles)

More information & to book a place: ihealthbeing@gmail.com - 07958 495537 

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Workshop on “Diet according to Age, Season, Person & Place”

“Ancient Wisdom & Harmonious Diet” 

So you think you are eating well?

Did you know that ‘time, person & place’ matter for diet & health?

2,500 years ago, Hippocrates taught how dietary needs change with age, season of the year, personal characteristics and the place one lives. Now modern science has revealed more.

To find out more about the importance of individualised diet, come to our 2nd “Ancient Wisdom & Harmonious Diet” workshop with Dr Eleni.

Saturday 17 Jan 2015 12-2:00 pm

8-9 Hop Gardens (off St Martin’s Lane), London WC2N 4EH 

Suggested donation: £20 (includes Greek mountain tea & biscuits

More information & to register: ihealthbeing@gmail.com - 07958495537  

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Hippocrates Timeless Still

My article in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 

J R Soc Med. 2013 Jul;106(7):288-92

can also be read in full here in the James Lind Library online

Hippocrates UCL

Hippocrates put the person at the center of his attention, while modern medicine focuses on the disease. Hippocrates was first and foremost interested in finding out what led to the development of the symptoms experienced by the person. He distinguished lifestyle patterns and personal characteristics that predisposed to certain conditions. Although modern medicine is increasingly accepting the importance of lifestyle in the development of chronic diseases, it continues to give priority to examining the illness and treating the symptoms. Hippocratic therapies involved primarily changes in food, exercise and other lifestyle patterns while modern medical treatments concentrate on pharmacological and surgical interventions.

In The Art, the writer gives general advice on how a patient should be treated. He explains that medical treatment consists of much more than drugs:

The most famous doctors cure by changing the diet and lifestyle of their patient and, by using other substances. Such capable doctors have the knowledge and ability to use
the therapeutic properties of most natural or man-made products (The Art 2.6; Jones 1923)

 

“Ancient Wisdom and Harmonious Diet” Introductory Workshop

Introductory workshop on Saturday 8th of November from 1-3 pm

(including herbal tea made with the famous Greek Mountain sideritis flowers & Kozani saffron, Dr Eleni’s joy biscuits and recipes)

Nutritional Medicine meets Greek Philosophy

Our food & the way we eat, combined with the exercise we take and other lifestyle factors, are key factors for our health and well-being.

Come and learn in this 2 hour introductory workshop how to combine the wisdom of the ancient Greek philosopher & father of Medicine Hippocrates, with the science of Nutritional Medicine. Use the lessons and aphorisms of Hippocrates and the knowledge of modern science to begin transforming your health and achieve a harmonious diet, lifestyle and way of being.

To register, e-mail ihealthbeing@gmail.com

or call 07958 495537

Workshop to take place at the Health Being Institute, Woolman room, Quaker Meeting House, 8 Hop Gardens, London WC2N 4EH

Fee £20

Dr Eleni's Ancient Wisdom & Harmonious Diet

 

Why I am looking forward to my talk next week at the British Oncology Pharmacy Association

Slowly but steadily healthcare professionals acknowledge the important role nutrition has to play in the management of people with cancer.

Next week I will be speaking to UK oncology pharmacists about the value of good nutrition in cancer patients

I am going to talk about the two big systematic reviews which showed that current dietetic treatment of cancer patients has no evidence base. I will then ask the audience to consider ways forward.

I will also offer my informed opinion on how we should be using diet and lifestyle to support people diagnosed with cancer: at the time of diagnosis, during their treatment, when they are cleared of any signs of cancer, when they are at the palliative stage and when they are dying.

Nutritional and lifestyle medicine can be of huge help to cancer patients. The literature to support this is significant and the majority of people affected seeks ways to improve their diet and lifestyle, in parallel to their pharmacological treatment.

It’s time for the NHS to acknowledge and endorse the ancient motto that ‘Food is Medicine’

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Walking v Running – which is the healthiest?

 

While I was away, I read some interesting articles about the relative benefits of walking and running. This was of interest to me, as I had taken the advice of Eleni Tsiompanou, the integrative doctor at Penny Brohn, to stop running some time ago.Overall, it seems the benefits of a 5-minute run, match those of a 15-minute walk. Broadly speaking, it seems the benefits associated with a 25-minute run are equivalent to walking for 1 hour 45 minutes. Obviously if you are  young  healthy and reasonably fit, running is more time-efficient. Or is it? With running there is time spent getting changed twice and showering afterwards. (Assuming that you have a healthy attitude to personal hygiene) Plus, there is the  time stretching (before and/or after running) and maybe even cooling down. So a 15-minute run could, in reality, easily take an hour out of one’s day. This is  significantly more time than that devoted to say, a 45-minute walk (which, generally, will require no changing, stretching or showering) and you spend all the time outside!Runners may also be prone to injury. I know from first hand experience about this. When I used to run a lot, I had a succession of running related injuries (shin splints, right calf,  lower back, to name a few), which was one of the reasons which eventually led me to think about giving up running.Prior to my liver resection in February 2011, I had a personal trainer who was helping me get fit again, after a year of very gentle exercise. My aim was to run a 10km race and raise money for cancer charities. I was feeling great and beginning to enjoy the running. Then I was diagnosed with a metastasise in my liver. It required surgery. I had to stop the running while I recovered from my surgery.

That March as part of my post op recovery, I went to Penny Brohn for a few days. During which I saw Eleni  Tsiompanou ( an Intergrative Health Doctor) and we discussed the subject of exercise and how much was advisable. I told her what my plans were and that I hoped to get back to running again soon. I was not expecting what she said. I remember her words “Running – no way – this is far too much for you. Walking – most definitely and as much as you like. But running no”.  I was confused!

The reason, she explained to me, was that my immune system was having a difficult time dealing with fighting off the cancer cells floating around my body. Running can suppress the immune system. So if my immune system is suppressed after I run then the cancer cells can prosper. Which is not a good idea.This made sense! Cardio/aerobic (distance) running is known to (stress) suppress the immune system, You only have to think of distance runners such as Mo Farah, Paula Radcliffe who have been prone to infection illnesses . 

Walking can be sustained all year and can be carried on as you get older. Walking is much easier and in my experience it is more conducive to ‘social networking’. Another advantage of walking is that it can easily be incorporated into one’s daily routine. My friends are of the age when going for a walk is not too off putting. I can’t think too many of my friends who would get excited by asking them to go for a 5km run. But a walk with Colin and me seems to be OK.

Source: http://addictedtogreentea.blogspot.co.uk

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Diet and Hippocratic Philosophy

If you are interested in using diet and Ancient Greek wisdom to live a more healthy life,  join the Health Being Institute education program on: “Diet and Hippocratic Wisdom”.

The program will be launched next Monday in the birth country of Hippocrates, Greece. A number of workshops will be given from September onwards in Central London.

What you will learn:

* How ancient Hippocratic philosophy still teaches us methods to be healthy

* How to use the wisdom of Ancient Greek philosophers to uncover you long-term beliefs and unconscious attitudes towards your body, health and well-being

* What are the lessons that Hippocratic philosophy can teach us today

* What modern science has proven to be true of the Hippocratic medicine and how to use it to move towards a healthier you

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“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”

Exposed by my children for what I really look like

Flipping through the pictures on my phone, I see it.

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My first reaction is shock. Who took this hideous picture of me?

Self-loathing and disgust swell up and threaten to bring me to tears.

Just as I am about to hit delete, my boy walks in the room.

“Do you know anything about this picture?” I ask him.

I turn the screen so he can see it. He smiles huge.

“I took that of you in Tahoe,” he says. “You looked so beautiful laying there. I couldn’t help it mom.”

“You need to ask me before using my phone to take pictures,” I say.

“I know,” he says. “But mom, seriously, look how pretty you look?”

I look at the picture again and try to see what he sees.

My daughter walks over and takes a look.

“That could be a postcard mom,” she says smiling. “You’re so beautiful. I love it.”

I take a deep breath.

This is exactly what I needed.

My default mode is to see and focus on the flaws and imperfections. I’m starting to see a bit more.

I still see my dimply, fat thighs.

I also see a mom collapsed on the shore that just explored the lake for hours with her children.

I still see chubby arms.

I also see the arms of a mom that just helped her kids across the rocks and hot sand so their feet wouldn’t hurt.

I still see a fat woman wearing a black dress bathing suit to try to hide her weight issue.

I also see an adventurous mom that loves her children something fierce.

Like many women, I have struggled with my weight most of my life. It’s not something that will ever go away for me. I don’t have a naturally slim body. Never have.

Right now I’m the heaviest I’ve been in 10 years. Yet…

I have not let my weight stop me this time. I am wearing tank tops, sundresses and bathing suits in public. I’m running around playing with my kids this summer and I sometimes even feel attractive.

Yes. You heard me.

“I feel pretty. Oh so pretty. I feel pretty, and witty and bright.”

Well…not exactly. But something like that.

Is it because I’m getting older? Is it that I have more to worry about than just how I look? Or maybe it’s because my kids look at me with such adoring eyes.

Really, it doesn’t matter.

I don’t hate my body anymore.

That’s huge for me to admit and hard to even wrap my mind around.

I’m not giving up on exercising and getting healthy. Those are things I will continue to strive for because I want to be around awhile.

Right now though, I just want to love my body where it is. I want it to be OK to see myself the way my kids do.

Thank you kids.

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* Here is another “secret” picture the kids took of me on our day trip to the beach.

Source: Bridgette Tales

Top American Cardiologist recommends Vegan Diet for Heart Health

CardioBuzz: Vegan Diet, Healthy Heart?

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In this guest blog, Kim A. Williams, MD, a cardiologist at Rush University in Chicago and the next president of the American College of Cardiology, explains why he went vegan and now recommends it to patients.

Physicians want to influence their patients to make lifestyle changes that will improve their health, but sometimes the roles are reversed and we are inspired by patients. It was a patient’s success reversing an alarming condition that motivated me to investigate a vegan diet.

Just before the American College of Cardiology’s (ACC) annual meeting in 2003 I learned that my LDL cholesterol level was 170. It was clear that I needed to change something. Six months earlier, I had read a nuclear scan on a patient with very-high-risk findings — a severe three-vessel disease pattern of reversible ischemia.

The patient came back to the nuclear lab just before that 2003 ACC meeting. She had been following Dean Ornish, MD’s program for “Reversing Heart Disease,” which includes a plant-based diet, exercise, and meditation. She said that her chest pain had resolved in about 6 weeks, and her scan had become essentially normalized on this program.

When I got that LDL result, I looked up the details of the plant-based diet in Ornish’s publications — 1- and 5-year angiographic outcomes and marked improvement on PET perfusion scanning — small numbers of patients, but outcomes that reached statistical significance.

I thought I had a healthy diet — no red meat, no fried foods, little dairy, just chicken breast and fish. But a simple Web search informed me that my chicken-breast meals had more cholesterol content (84 mg/100 g) than pork (62 mg/100 g). So I changed that day to a cholesterol-free diet, using “meat substitutes” commonly available in stores and restaurants for protein. Within 6 weeks my LDL cholesterol level was down to 90.

I often discuss the benefits of adopting a plant-based diet with patients who have high cholesterol, diabetes, hypertension, or coronary artery disease. I encourage these patients to go to the grocery store and sample different plant-based versions of many of the basic foods they eat. For me, some of the items, such as chicken and egg substitutes, were actually better-tasting.

There are dozens of products to sample and there will obviously be some that you like and some that you don’t. One of my favorite sampling venues was the new Tiger Stadium (Comerica Park) in Detroit, where there are five vegan items, including an Italian sausage that is hard to distinguish from real meat until you check your blood pressure – vegan protein makes blood pressures fall.

In some parts of country and some parts of world, finding vegan restaurants can be a challenge. But in most places, it is pretty easy to find vegan-friendly options with a little local Web searching. Web searching can also help with the patients who are concerned about taste or missing their favorite foods. I typically search with the patient and quickly email suggestions.

Interestingly, our ACC/American Heart Association (AHA) prevention guidelines do not specifically recommend a vegan diet, as the studies are very large and observational or small and randomized, such as those on Ornish’s whole food, plant-based diet intervention reversing coronary artery stenosis. The data are very compelling, but larger randomized trials are needed to pass muster with our rigorous guideline methodology.

Wouldn’t it be a laudable goal of the American College of Cardiology to put ourselves out of business within a generation or two? We have come a long way in prevention of cardiovascular disease, but we still have a long way to go. Improving our lifestyles with improved diet and exercise will help us get there.

CardioBuzz is a blog for readers with an interest in cardiology.

Credits: Kim A. Williams MD, medpagetoday.com

Natural sources of Vitamin B12 for vegetarians

Dried Purple Laver

The main sources of vitamin B12 are animal foods.

People who are vegetarians are at risk of becoming vitamin B12 deficient, especially if they have other factors that can cause

  • increased demand such as during pregnancy or
  • impaired absorption of the vitamin, such as after stomach or gut surgery, from long-term use of proton pump inhibitors, due to malabsorption or small bowel bacterial overgrowth, as a result of alcoholism or malnutrition due to various causes

A new study from Japan looked in detail at the various sources of vitamin B12 for vegetarians. The researchers found that the highest concentration is found in:

dried purple laver, an edible seaweed called Nori in Japan, Zicai in China and Gim in Korea

Read more in their article published in the peer review journal Nutrients.

The full article can be accessed for free here:

http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/6/5/1861

Nori is easy to use. Sprinkle it over salad or make sushi are two ways to eat it raw. It’s better not to toast it as it reduces the concentration of vitamin B12.

Remember: Eat Real Food. It is always better than taking supplements.